Листовка для NuForce AVP-16

Скачать
Страница из 2
specifically for the left, center, right, and 
subwoofer channels. This design touch 
acknowledges the fact that some audio-
philes already own amplifiers with XLR-
inputs, and that stereo purists might 
wish to make the transition to surround 
sound incrementally, adding a center 
channel and subwoofer 
first and surround 
channels later on. 
Purists Dig It
How does the AVP-16 
perform in real-world 
systems? I found the 
AVP-16 was at its 
best when playing 
high-resolution mu-
sic material (SACD, 
DVD-Audio, and Dual-
Disc) in B
ypass
 mode. 
Solid-state preamps 
sometimes have a 
cold, sterile quality 
that distances listen-
ers from the music, but 
the AVP-16 does not. 
Instead, it offers a de-
lightful combination of 
clarity and natural, or-
ganic warmth. On Gary 
Burton’s Like Minds 
[Concord, SACD], for 
instance, the AVP-16 
brought out the round, 
full, honey-sweet to-
nality of Pat Metheny’s 
jazz guitar, yet it also 
had sufficient transpar-
ency to reproduce the 
sound of Roy Haynes’s 
sure and almost in-
describably delicate percussion work. 
The AVP-16’s overall presentation on 
Like Minds was so clean and pure that 
many guest listeners offered unprompt-
ed compliments on the sound. On 
well-recorded orchestral material such 
as the Gergov/Norrlands performance 
of David Chesky’s 
Concerto for Orches-
tra
 [Urban Concertos
Chesky, SACD], the 
NuForce did a great job 
of capturing the ambi-
ence of the recording 
venue while convey-
ing the sound of an 
orchestra arrayed on a 
wide, deep, three-di-
mensional soundstage. 
Overall, the AVP-16 
sounded much like 
NuForce’s excellent 
P8 stereo preampli-
fier (reviewed in The 
Absolute Sound
 issue 
169), which is saying 
a mouthful given that 
the AVP-16 costs less 
than the P8 does.
On CDs and other 
stereo program mate-
rial the AVP-16 per-
formed well, offering 
the expected bat-
teries of Dolby PL II 
and DTS Neo:6 pro-
cessing modes, plus 
eight proprietary DSP 
modes (c
hurch
, s
ta
-
DiuM
, t
hEatEr
, and so 
on.). The Dolby and 
DTS modes proved 
effective, though their sound was 
not quite as pure and transparent 
as that of the B
ypass
 mode. My sug-
gestion would be to avoid using the 
AVP-16’s other DSP modes, though, 
since they aren’t up to the controller’s 
otherwise high sonic standards.
On DVD movies, the AVP-16’s video 
pass-through switching added no 
visible noise or artifacts. Sonically, 
the controller’s Dolby Digital and DTS 
decoders worked well, though they 
sometimes smoothed over extremely 
low-level, high frequency textural de-
tails. As a small example, consider the 
“Ann Disarms Kong” scene from King 
Kong
 where Kong seizes a full-grown 
bamboo tree to munch on as a light 
snack. High-resolution controllers let 
you hear an explicit snap and crunch as 
the thick, tubular bamboo trunk breaks 
apart while Kong chomps down on it. In 
contrast, the AVP-16 captures the snap 
of the trunk but loses textural detail 
as Kong chews on the shattered tree. 
Nevertheless, the AVP-16’s surround 
sound processing easily equals that of 
most mid- and some high-priced AVRs.
The AVP-16 will appeal to stereo 
enthusiasts looking to take their first 
steps toward home theater and mul-
tichannel music. The NuForce pro-
vides the core sonic qualities that 
audiophile’s demand, with solid though 
minimalist video switching and sur-
round sound processing features. 
TPV
   
•  Fine sound quality in BYPASS 
mode
•  Nice combination of clarity and 
warmth
•  Simple, effective video and  
surround sound features
•  Value
•  No HDMI, no video upconversion, 
no auto-setup
•  Surround modes not as pure as 
BYPASS mode
•  Remote is beautifully made, but 
ergonomics need work
Specifications
NuForce AVP-16 Multichannel Controller
•  Decoding formats: Dolby Digital , Digital 
EX and Pro Logic IIx; DTS, DTS-ES and 
Neo:6; eight proprietary DSP modes.
•  Video inputs/outputs: Component video 
(three in, one out with support up to 
1080i), S-video (four in, one out), compos-
ite video (four in, o ne out)
•  Audio inputs/outputs: 7.1-channel analog 
(single-ended RCA, one in, one out), 3.1-
channel analog (balanced XLR, one out), 
stereo analog (seven in, one out), digital 
audio (seven in—four coax, three optical)
•  Dimensions: 3.54" x 17" x 18"
•  Weight: 17.5 lbs.
•  Price: $995
• nuforce.com
The Last Word
Poor
Good
Excellent
1
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Value
Sound quality, film
Sound quality, music
User interface
NuForce AVP-16 Multichannel Controller      
(compared with similarly priced multichannel controllers)
TPV  |  March 2007
55
analog direct mode, and when 
playing well-recorded material 
at moderate volume levels. The 
receiver’s subtle touch of warmth 
and overall clarity helped it 
render instrumental and vocal 
timbres effectively. For example, 
it sounded terrific on the Heifetz 
recording of the Sibelius Violin 
Concerto in D Minor
 [RCA Living 
Stereo, multichannel SACD], cap-
turing the violinist’s sweet, sure, 
lustrous string tone.  Two small 
drawbacks are that the Sony 
offers good but not great sound-
staging and can sound bright or 
rough on vigorous transients. 
Fortunately, these minor flaws 
rarely intrude on the Sony’s 
warm and inviting core sound.
Lost in Translation
The only area where I had 
significant reservations about the 
STR-DG800 involved its user 
interface, which I found difficult 
to use. First, the receiver provides 
no onscreen menu display, 
instead showing menu informa-
tion only in the receiver’s front 
panel display window. Second, 
the Sony’s automated speaker 
set-up feature for some reason 
recognizes all speakers in the 
system except for powered 
subwoofers. As a result, all 
subwoofer configuration settings 
must be entered manually. 
Finally, the receiver’s remote 
control is far from intuitive and 
makes common control tasks (for 
example, adjusting channel level 
trims on the fly) much more 
difficult than they ought to be. 
Overall, Sony’s STR-DG800 
receiver offers a versatile mix of 
features, functions, and I/O 
options, and it provides very 
strong core performance for the 
money.
My only wish is that its user 
interface made its performance 
capabilities easier to tap—
especially for first-time AVR 
owners. The good news is that 
the performance fundamentals 
are all in place; Sony just needs 
to do a bit more work on the fine 
points.
TPV
www.theperfectvision.com   March 2007
71
Sony   
|
  (877) 865-7669  
|
  www.sonystyle.com
I N S I D E R S  T I P :
Do not even 
think about setting this 
AVR up without reading its manual 
beforehand.
!
93083.071   71
1/26/07   9:53:37 AM